Praying with Art: the Parables

6 September to 6 December 2022

Participants’ Page

Previously, our Praying with Art seminar focused on the events of Christ’s life. This fall semester we’ll discover more about His parables and pray with the art that illustrates them. The parables are so central to Jesus’ teaching that Matthew tells us Jesus said nothing to the crowds without using a parable (Mt. 13:34). His parables are more varied in content and form than anyone else’s. And they are rich in meaning, since Jesus used them to teach us about the Kingdom of God and to hint indirectly at His own identity, while later Gospel writers adapted them to fit the needs of their day. The only texts needed will be those in the Gospels which will be supplied from this page and distributed when we gather in person. So join us to learn Scripture, appreciate art, pray with images and draw closer to the Lord.

FennessySugrue

Facilitators
Fr. Peter Fennessy, SJ, long-time member of the Manresa ministerial team,
Ms Carole Sugrue, docent at the Detroit Institute of Arts for 33 years.

Dates and Times:
7:00 PM to 8:30 PM on Tuesday evenings:

SessionDateSubjects
1Sept 6Plants and Growing Things
2Sept 20The Kingdom & New Leadership
3Oct 4The Generosity of God
4Oct 18The Lost is Found with Joy
5Nov 1Life in the Kingdom
6Nov 15The Wise and the Foolish
7Dec 6Separation at the End

 

Pray over the following  for CLASS 7 – DECEMBER 6

SCRIPTURE TEXTS FOR THE FOLLOWING PARABLES

6. THE WISE AND FOOLISH 

THE DISHONEST STEWARD 

Andrey Mironov, The Parable of the Unfaithful Steward (2021), oil on canvas, 23.62 × 27.56 inches.

Eugène Burnand (1850-1921), The Dishonest Steward 1 and The Dishonest Steward 2 (1905-1908), illustration in Les Paraboles (first published by Berger-Levrault in 1908). Burnand typically employed Conté crayon, charcoal, color wash, Indian ink, gouache, red chalk and colored pencils. Only a small number were printed in color.

FOOLISH RICH FARMER

James Tissot, The Man Who Hoards (1886-1894), gouache over graphite on gray wove paper, 7.8 × 5 inches, Brooklyn Museum.

WISE & FOOLISH BUILDERS

Georgios Mitrophanovits, The Lord’s Parable of the Wise and Foolish Builders (1623), icon fresco, Hilandar Monastery, Mount Athos, Greece.

WISE AND FOOLISH VIRGINS

Baron Ernest Friedrich von Liphart, Parable of the Wise and Foolish Virgins (1886). oil on canvas, The State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow.

Friedrich Wilhelm Schadow (1789-1862) The parable of the wise and foolish virgins, paint on canvas, 106.89 × 153.94 inches, The Städel Museum, Frankfurt, Germany.

Unknown Greek iconographer, The parable of the ten virgins, fresco.

WISE & FOOLISH DOORKEEPERS

Jan Luyken, The Faithful and Wise Steward, etching, an illustration in the Bowyer Bible, Bolton Museum, Bolton, Greater Manchester, England.

Xenophon Bokos, Behold, the Bridegroom Comes (2012), Greek icon.

William Holman Hunt, The Light of the World (1853), oil on canvas, 49.2 × 23.6 inches, Keble College, Oxford, England.

Prepare the following, if you wish  for CLASS 7 – DECEMBER 6

SCRIPTURE TEXTS FOR THE FOLLOWING PARABLES

7 – WE ARE MIXED NOW BUT SEPARATION AT THE END

DRAGNET & WHEAT AND WEEDS

Rowland Fisher (1885-1969), Sorting the Catch, oil, 10 × 12 inches.

Bernardus Johannes Blommers (active 1860 – 1914), Sorting the Catch, oil on canvas, 25.6 × 47.2 inches.

Heinrich Füllmaurer, The parable of the weeds among the wheat (detail) [one of 157 images on the Mömpelgard Altar] (c. 1540), oil on spruce wood, original image 16.1 × 11 inches, Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna, Austria.

Domenico Fetti, The Parable of the Weeds (detail) (c. 1622), oil on panel. 24.02 × 17.52 inches, Museo Nacional Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid.

THE RICH MAN AND LAZARUS

Leandro Bassano, Dives and Lazarus (detail) (c. 1595), oil on canvas, original size 39.3 × 48.4 inches, private collection.

John Everett Millais, The rich man and Lazarus (1863), watercolor and gouache on paper, 5.55 × 4.33 inches.

Barent Fabritius, Lazarus and the rich man (and two details: death of rich man, death of Lazarus and the destiny of the two) (1661), oil on canvas, 37.4 × 114.9 inches, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, Netherlands.

PHARISEE & PUBLICAN

Barent Fabritius, The Pharisee and the Publican (and three details: the two praying, the Pharisee leaving, the Publican leaving) (1661), oil on canvas, 37.4 × 115.35 inches, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, Netherlands.

THE TWO SONS

Eugène Burnand (1850-1921), The Two Sons (1905-1908), illustration in Les Paraboles (first published by Berger-Levrault in 1908). Burnand typically employed Conté crayon, charcoal, color wash, Indian ink, gouache, red chalk and colored pencils. Only a small number were printed in color.

FINAL IMAGES

Peter Winfried Koenig, Christ the Teacher (2010), The Estate of Canon John Koenig of St Edward’s Parish Kettering.

James C. Christensen, Parables (2009), 30 × 40 inches.

                                                                         KENNETH E. BAILEY (1930 –2016)

Bailey  specialized in looking at the parables of Jesus through Middle Eastern eyes which see it differently from us. His fifteen 30-minute talks on the parables are on line. These are not required but any or all of them might be of interest to you.

  1. Introduction
  1. The Good Samaritan: (Luke 10:25-37)

        3: The Lost Coin and the Lost Sheep (Lk 15:1-10)

  1. The Lost Younger Son (Luke 15:11-24)
  1. The Lost Older Son (Luke 15:25-32)
  1. The Woman in the House of Simon (Luke 7:36-50)
  1. The Rich Fool (Luke 12:13-21)
  1. The Great Banquet (Luke 14:15-24)
  1. The Sower (Luke 8:4-15) and The Two Builders (Luke 6:46-49)
  1. Zacchaeus (Luke 19:1-10)
  1. The Unjust Steward – The Man with Mammon

      12 The Three Disciples & The Friend at Midnight

  1. The Pharisee and the Tax Collector
  1. Pilate, the Galileans and the Tower and the Barren Fig Tree
  1. The Farmer and His Servant & The Widow and the Unjust Judge (Luke 18:1-8)
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